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Middle West Utilities Company

$12.00 $7.97

SKU: 1703

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Product Details

 

Beautifully engraved antique stock certificate from the Middle West Utilities Company dating back to the 1930's. This document, which is signed by the company Vice President and Secretary, was printed by the Western Bank Note Company, and measures approximately 12" (w) by 8" (h).

 

This certificate's fantastic vignette features a trio of allegorical figures surrounding a framed city scene and dynamo.

Images

You will receive the exact certificate pictured.

 

PLEASE NOTE paper loss at lower right side.

    Historical Context

    In 1912, Samuel Insull formed the Middle West Utilities Company, a holding company which eventually acquired many electric railways and utilities throughout the United States. In 1924, Insull also formed Midland Utilities Company owning electric railways and utilities in Indiana. In addition, Insull continued to control Commonwealth Edison, the Chicago Rapid Transit Company, and acquired three electric interurban railways operating into Chicago.

     

    The Middle West Utilities Company's holdings included:

     

    • Southwestern Gas & Electric Company
    • Central Illinois Public Service Company
    • Illinois Northern Utilities Company
    • Kansas Electric Power Company
    • Kentucky Securities Corporation
    • Kentucky Utilities Company
    • New England Public Service Company
    • Tide Water Power Company
    • Southwest Power Company
    • Municipal Service Company
    • Lewistown & Reedsville Railroad Company
    • American Public Service Company
    • Central & Southwest Utilities Company
    • Twin State Gas & Electric Company
    • Virginia Public Service Company
    • Lake Superior District Power Company
    • Wisconsin Power & Light Company

     

    After Insull’s vigorous promotion of such companies’ stocks, various circumstances related to the Depression brought about the collapse of his top companies, which went into receivership in 1932. Insull fled to Europe and fought to escape extradition. He was returned to Chicago in 1934 and tried three times for fraud, violation of federal bankruptcy laws, and embezzlement, but he was acquitted each time. He spent most of the rest of his life in Europe.