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Ling-Temco-Vought, Inc.

$8.00

SKU: 3252
Product Details

Nicely engraved antique stock certificate from Ling-Temco-Vought, Inc. dating back to the 1970's. This document, which contains the printed signatures of the company President and Secretary, was printed by the American Bank Note Company, and measures approximately 12" (w) by 8" (h).

 

This certificate's vignette features a nude male figure behind a series of panels depicting space, cloads, the sea and a hemispherical map of North and South America.

The images presented are representative of the piece(s) you will receive. When representative images are presented for one of our offerings, you will receive a certificate in similar condition as the one pictured; however dating, denomination, certificate number and issuance details may vary.

    Historical Context

    In 1947 James J. Ling formed the Ling Electric Company, a Dallas-based electrical construction and engineering company, with an initial investment of $2,000.

    Nine years later, Ling Electric merged with L.M. Electronics of California to form Ling Electronics. In 1959, Ling Electronics merged with Altec Inc. (manufacturer of commercial sound systems) to become Ling-Altec Electronics Inc. The next year, Ling-Altec Electronics merged with Dallas-based Temco Electronics and Missile Company to become Ling-Temco Electronics Inc.

    In 1961, Ling-Temco Electronics merged with Chance Vought Aircraft of Dallas (the nation's second oldest continuous producer of military aircraft, founded in 1917) and the name of the company was changed to Ling-Temco-Vought Inc.

    In 1965, Ling-Temco-Vought acquired the Okonite Company (wire and cable), and two years later acquired Wilson & Company (foods, sporting, goods, pharmaceuticals and chemicals).

    The acquisition spree continued in 1968 when Ling-Temco-Vought acquired Greatamerica Corporation (parent of Braniff International and National Car Rental) and also purchased majority interest inJones & Laughlin Steel Corporation of Pittsburgh. The J&L acquisition prompted a federal antitrust investigation and lawsuit.

    In 1972 , the company changed its direction, management philosophy and name. Ling-Temco-Vought, the holding company, became the LTV Corporation, an operating company directly involved with its subsidiaries.