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International Immigration and Colonization Association, Limited (Certificate #1)

$175.00

SKU: 7796
Product Details

Intricately engraved antique stock certificate from the International Immigration and Colonization Association, Limited dating back to the 1910's. This document, which is signed by the company President and Treasurer, was printed by Goes and measures approximately 11 (w) by 8 14" (h).

 

This piece's unique vignette shows ships leaving from various countries headed to Honolulu.

 

Rare piece. Certificate #1!

You will receive the exact certificate pictured.
    Historical Context

    The International Immigration and Colonization Association, Limited was incorporated in Hawaii on December 24, 1910. The company was involved in bringing foreign nationals to the United States via Hawaii.

    United States Congressional hearings in 1921 described the process as follows:

    "After some preliminary correspondence touching upon Russian immigration to Hawaii generally, the board of immigration during the month of July, 1911, entered into an agreement with the International Immigration and Colonization Association for the introduction of small parties of Russian immigrants. This agreement was in  existence up to April 19, 1912, when the board notified the association of its unwillingness to further continue its work in Manchuria. During the period in which the  agreement existed, 266 Russians were brought into the Territory at a cost to the Government of $16,055.10, an average cost per male of $140.83 and a per capita of $60.35. The total number of Russians introduced since the commencement of this work in 1909 was 2,056, comprised of 1,038 men, 457 women, and 561 children, at a cost of $177,963.16, an average cost per male of $171.44 and a per capita of $86.55. It was estimated that of the total number introduced there were remaining in the Territory, June 30, 1912, some 1,085, most of whom, however, engaged upon general work throughout the country other than that supplied or offered by the plantations, and a considerable number of these have since left. For the year ending June 30, 1917, the Hawaiian Sugar Planters' Association reported but 49 Russians as being employed on the plantations."