YOUR SOURCE FOR ANTIQUE STOCK AND BOND CERTIFICATES
Only 1 Available!

Central Pacific Railway Company

$25.00

SKU: 561
Product Details

 

Beautifully engraved antique bond certificate from the Central Pacific Railway Company dating back to the 1940's. This document, which is signed by the Vice President and Assistant Secretary, was printed by the Columbian Bank Note Company and measures approximately 10" (w) by 15" (h). 

 

This certificate features a vignette of a locomotive flanked by a pair of allegorical male figures.

Images

You will receive the exact certificate pictured.

    Historical Context

    The Central Pacific Railroad was founded in 1861 by a group of California merchants known later as the “Big Four” (Collis P. Huntington, Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker); they are best remembered for having built part of the first American transcontinental rail line. The line was first conceived and surveyed by an engineer, Theodore Dehone Judah, who obtained the financial backing of the California group and won federal support in the form of the Pacific Railway Act (1862), which provided land grants and subsidies to the Central Pacific and Union Pacific. Each company was granted financial support from government bonds and awarded sizable parcels of land along the entire length of their route as an added incentive.

    Huntington represented the company in the East, handling the financing and purchasing and acting as political lobbyist. Crocker was in charge of construction. Stanford, who was governor of California in 1862–63, saw to the company’s financial and political interests in the West. The associates subscribed some of their own funds initially, but most of the capital for the actual construction came from public funds and grants. All four men became enormously wealthy. (Stanford went on to found Stanford University.)

    The Central Pacific began laying track eastward from Sacramento, California, in 1863, and the Union Pacific started westward from Omaha, Nebraska, two years later. To meet its manpower needs, the Central Pacific hired thousands of Chinese laborers, including many recruited from farms in Canton. The crew had the formidable task of laying the track that crossed the rugged Sierra Nevada mountain range, blasting nine tunnels to accomplish this. The crew of the Union Pacific, which was composed largely of Irish immigrants and Civil War veterans, had to contend with Indian attacks and the Rocky Mountains. On May 10, 1869, after completing 1,800 miles (2,900 km) of new track, the two rail lines met at Promontory, Utah.

    In subsequent years feeder lines of the Central Pacific were established throughout California (some of them under the umbrella of a company called the Southern Pacific Company of California), and already existing trackage along southern routes to Texas and New Orleans, Louisiana, was acquired. On March 17, 1884, a new Southern Pacific Company was incorporated (under a special Kentucky charter) to act as a holding company for the several operating railroads; the Central Pacific was leased to it until 1959, when they merged.