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Buffalo, Niagara and Eastern Power Corporation

$16.00

SKU: 2130

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Product Details

Intricately engraved antique stock certificate from the Buffalo, Niagara and Eastern Power Corporation dating back to the 1920's. This document, which is signed by the company Vice President and Assistant Treasurer/Secretary, was printed by the American Bank Note Company, and measures approximately 11" (w) by 7" (h).

 

The vignette features a man standing next to a huge dynamo, flanked by a pair of Niagara Falls scenes.

You will receive the exact certificate pictured.

    Historical Context

    By 1915, the Cataract Power and Conduit Company saw merging as the answer to growth problems. That year the company, as three electric light companies had done earlier, merged with General Electric of Buffalo. Thus General Electric became Buffalo's largest power company. By 1920, many Buffalo companies had merged. Power men began to ask themselves why they should not merge power companies in different cities, thus forming a more efficient company. They set to work on the question.

    A giant corporation was born a few years later. In 1925, the Buffalo, Niagara and Eastern Power Corporation took over General Electric of Buffalo and the Charles R. Huntley generating plant near the Niagara River. The corporation also took over the Niagara, Lockport and Ontario Power Company. The Tonawanda Power Company, distributor for the Niagara Falls Power Company, joined the corporation. For twenty-five years this Buffalo, Niagara and Eastern Power Corporation controlled most power generation and
    transmission in the area.

    In 1950, one more important merger took place. During World War II, Buffalo, Niagara and Eastern had expanded production. After the war, seeking greater operating economy and cheaper power for customers, it merged with other companies. Niagara Hudson, which had given twenty-five years of service was dissolved in 1945-50, and the giant Niagara Mohawk Corporation was born. This marked the peak of power development through mergers.