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Bristol Railroad Company (Vermont)

$15.00

SKU: 4630
Product Details

Beautifully engraved antique stock certificate from the Bristol Railroad Company dating back to the early 1900's. This document was printed by Corlies, Macy & Co. Stationers and measures approximately 11 1/4" (w) by 7 1/4" (h). 

 

This certificate features a detailed vignette of a locomotive and tender.

The images presented are representative of the piece(s) you will receive. When representative images are presented for one of our offerings, you will receive a certificate in similar condition as the one pictured; however dating, denomination, certificate number and issuance details may vary.

    Historical Context

    The Bristol Railroad was a short-line railroad in Addison County, Vermont. The road ran from Bristol to New Haven, a distance of 6.26 miles, where it connected with the Rutland Railroad.

    Businessmen in the town of Bristol, with the help of some New York capitalists, chartered the railroad in 1890, but the project languished until July 31, 1891, when Percival W. Clement,a prominent Rutland banker, President of the Rutland Railroad (1888-1902) and future Governor of Vermont (1919-1921), revived the project. the railroad would have its grand opening on January 1, 1892, although limited service had actually begun on November 25, 1891, when a car of potatoes was shipped out of Bristol.

    The railroad never did much business, and it is unlikely that it ever hauled more than a three-car train. Freight traffic included lumber, potatoes, maple syrup and coffins (from the Bristol Manufacturing Company), coal and manufactured goods. A one-way trip could take as little as 18 minutes, if the locomotive had only one car to handle.

    When Clement died in 1927, the company lost its leader and principle backer. The historic flood of 1927 followed soon after. The railroad was abandoned during the Great Depression, with the last run coming on April 12, 1930. One man, John S. Burt, rode both the grand opening train and the final train. The western part of the right of way was used to build Vermont Route 17. Both the Bristol and New Haven Junction stations survive.